Floating hide photography

It is clear that for this kind of photography you need to have the right conditions. A pond that is accessible; has the right depth and some wildlife on it. You must be able to walk in the pond.


Secondly you need to have a floating hide; for that we have the Mr. Jan Gear equipment. The third version of this unsurpassed piece of equipment came on the market recently. Check it out here: https://mrjangear.com/shop/floating-hide-3-combo/


On my latest trip to Kazachstan I had a version 2 at my disposal. This thing comes in a lightweight small package that is easily taken on an airplane with you. Putting it together again is easy and on the water it is a joy to use.


So you are ready to go into the water. But an important factor that can withhold you from doing so is the wind. On the steppes of Kazachstan this was an important factor! We regularly had stronger winds, especially in the afternoon. Controlling the hide is difficult and focusing on your subject is like playing the jackpot. You loose more often than you win.


It is such a pity because the waves on the water surface can give you an interesting picture. So I had the idea of positioning myself with the hide against the edge of a mudflat. Let's say I anchored myself there in a position where I had a good photo range on the mudflat a bit further in the water that was heavily frequented by waders. Moreover I would have a nice sunset later on.


You can't say that this is comfortable; I had to ly down in the mudwater resting one arm on one of the tubes and although I am the smaller type part of my legs was outside; photographing and framing had to be done on the lcd screen; no way to use the viewfinder; but since I work mirrorless I am used to do so in the floating hide; more I prefer it and once you are used to it it is great; in the meantime I am a skilled lcd shooter; try it.

I had to change my position inside the hide a few times over the session to avoid cramps and stretch the legs and so on. But the most important are the results as you can see here:




You can see Terek sandpiper, little stint, black winged stilt, curlew sandpiper, ruff and grey phalarope,

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